Apr 112011
 

CQI: “We’ve Always Done it This Way” vs. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)

Appeal to Tradition:

Appeal to tradition, also known as proof from tradition, appeal to common practice, argumentum ad antiquitatem, false induction, or the “is/ought” fallacy, is a common logical fallacy in which a thesis is deemed correct on the basis that it correlates with some past or present tradition. The appeal takes the form of “this is right because we’ve always done it this way.”

An appeal to tradition essentially makes two assumptions that are not necessarily true:

  • The old way of thinking was proven correct when introduced, i.e. since the old way of thinking was prevalent, it was necessarily correct.
    • In actuality this may be false — the tradition might be entirely based on incorrect grounds.
  • The past justifications for the tradition are still valid at present.
    • In actuality, the circumstances may have changed; this assumption may also therefore be untrue.

The opposite of an appeal to tradition is an appeal to novelty, claiming something is good because it is new.

What is Continuous Quality Improvement – CQI?

CQI is an approach to quality management that builds upon traditional quality assurance methods by emphasizing the organization and systems: it focuses on “process” rather than the individual; it recognizes both internal and external “customers”; it promotes the need for objective data to analyze and improve processes.

CQI is a management philosophy which contends that most things can be improved. This philosophy does not subscribe to the theory that “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” At the core of CQI is serial experimentation (the scientific method) applied to everyday work to meet the needs of those we serve and improve the services we offer.

Core Concepts of CQI

  • Quality is defined as meeting and/or exceeding the expectations of our customers.
  • Success is achieved through meeting the needs of those we serve.
  • Most problems are found in processes, not in people. CQI does not seek to blame, but rather to improve processes.
  • Unintended variation in processes can lead to unwanted variation in outcomes, and therefore we seek to reduce or eliminate unwanted variation.
  • It is possible to achieve continual improvement through small, incremental changes using the scientific method.
  • Continuous improvement is most effective when it becomes a natural part of the way everyday work is done.

Core Steps in Continuous Improvement

  • Form a team that has knowledge of the system needing improvement.
  • Define a clear aim.
  • Understand the needs of the people who are served by the system.
  • Identify and define measures of success.
  • Brainstorm potential change strategies for producing improvement.
  • Plan, collect, and use data for facilitating effective decision making.
  • Apply the scientific method to test and refine changes.

Where do you fit within the mix and where do these two divergent ideas converge in your world?

Is your approach the best it can be?

If  there was room for improvement, what would be required to move from the status quo?

What is your motivation to better your process and better your outcomes?

Is your motivation to improve internally or externally driven?

Please share with me your thoughts, below.

Thanks, Tom McDonald

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeal_to_tradition

http://www.fpm.iastate.edu/worldclass/cqi.asp

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To Discuss how these Solutions will add value for you, your organization and/or your clients, Affinity/Resale Opportunities, and/or Collaborative Efforts, Please Contact:

Tom McDonald, tsm@centurytel.net; 608-788-5144; Skype: tsmw5752

cqi, McDonald Sales and Marketing, LLC

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